Pink Plumerias

Alluring In Pink

Appearing in clusters at the end of branches, each plumeria is formed by five oval shaped waxy petals curled towards their edges, and carries a distinctive sweet and enticing scent which gets more pronounced in the evening. Their beauty and delightful scent make them universally loved and are commonly used as an ornamental flower in the home as well as a beauty accessory in the tropics. It is easily one of the most recognisable and popular ‘tropical’ flower (the thought of it alone connotes an exotic tropical feel) within the plant kingdom. The white variety being the most common, with many others ranging from deep crimson to orange and yellow.

Delicate Softness

The name ‘Plumeria’ is attributed to Charles Plumier, a 17th Century French botanist who described several tropical species. Its more common name today, frangipani, comes from the Italian nobleman, Marquis Frangipani, who created a perfume used to scent gloves in the 16th century.  When the plumeria flower was discovered its natural perfume reminded people of the scented gloves, and so the flower was called frangipani.

Curvaceous

These were all shot outdoor on a sunny morning, processed accordingly to emphasise the delicate shape, softness and alluring colours of the delightful pink plumerias. I hope it comes across well as intended. A good weekend to all.

All photos: Fujifilm X-E2 with XF 55-200 mm

 

 

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13 thoughts on “Pink Plumerias

    • hey patrick, how have you been? long time no hear. thanks for dropping by and commenting. haha, ‘all in lightness’, i like the phrase; thought i brighten my blog up a bit after all the dark and shadowy stuff i have been posting :). have a good weekend. ken.

  1. Plumeria…frangipani. Frangipani 😀 I always thought they were dark purple, Ken. Well done with the processing. I thought apart from making the petals look delicate, you made it look very dreamy. Flowers are always so vibrant and vivid in Malaysia.

    • there are quite a number of variety of plumerias/frangipani, dark purple is one of them and gives the strongest and loveliest scent, imho. your comment helps to confirm i took the right decision with the processing. with so much sun and rain thru the year, plants don’t have much choice but to look vibrant and vivid ;). thanks, mabel. ken

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